Acei Cichlid

Acei feeds on algae that have grown on wood. This is a popular cichlid in the hobby because of its gentle temperament, great monomorphic colors, and its tendency to swim in the top half of the aquarium.

 

Albino Buenos Aires Tetra

The Albino Buenos Aires Tetra is a South American fish that will make a great addition to any community aquarium. It has a slender silver body with red fins. The Buenos Aires Tetra can be housed in a aquarium with other soft water fish. Tetras are a schooling fish that work well in groups of six or more fish of the same species. Artificial plants, rocks and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces. The Buenos Aires Tetra will eat most live plants, except Java Fern.

Albino Channel Cat

Channel catfish are commonly available in the aquarium trade as 3 to 4 inch youngsters. They will readilly consume many other fish species and grow large in tanks. They make good scavengers in large tanks with fish such as Plecostomus, Oscars, cichlids, silver dollars, large Goldfish, and other large varieties.

Albino Clawed Frog

These are strictly aquatic anurans. At least 1 gallon of water per animal, with the depth no more than 12 inches and no less than six. Do not use distilled water. Bottles of tap water should stand open for at least 1 day before being poured into the tank to outgas chlorine and related chemicals.

Albino Cory Cat

The Aeneus Cory Cat requires a well planted aquarium with plenty of hiding places that provide relief from the light. A smooth sand or gravel substrate is needed because of the easily damaged barbels. They enjoy being in numbers, so a small school of six or more is ideal for these cats.

Albino Rainbow Shark

The Albino Rainbow Shark, also known as the Albino Ruby Shark or Albino Red-Finned Shark, is great for the semi-aggressive community aquarium, as long as they are the sole sharks and the other tankmates are of similar size. The Rainbow Shark is a beautifully colored fish which is a pink with bright red fins, and red eyes

Albino Tiger Barb

They are a very lively, playful fish that prefers to be in schools.
They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Albino Tiger Barb is a very active fish that may pester or even nip the fins of larger, slower-moving fish.

Australian Rainbow

This peaceful Rainbow is a schooling fish that thrives in a planted aquarium, but not too densely planted that there is insufficient free-swimming places available. The aquarium should have a gravel substrate; the colors of the fish may intensify with a dark colored gravel.

Bi-Color Maulana Cichlid

In the aquarium environment, this cichlid species is best kept with other peaceful cichlids. They should also be kept in tanks no smaller than 50 gallons as they reach adult lengths of 4-5 inches. They can be kept over sand or a fine gravel

Black Moor

Black moor goldfish are popular because they are hardy fish and because their black color sets them apart from the more common gold color. Goldfish are typically easy to care for. Black moors in particular are able to withstand a wide variety of temperatures. They do well with other fancy goldfish varieties.

Blackbelt Cichlid

Blackbelts like a sandy or fine gravel substrate. Simulate their natural habitat by providing lots of cover in the form of bits of wood (mopani, driftwood, bogwood). Blackbelt Cichlids thrive in lower lighting conditions so it may be beneficial to use floating plants to help dim the light.

Black HiFin Tetra

The Blackskirt Hifin Tetras like a well lit tank with dense areas of bunched low vegetation, which leaves lots of open areas for swimming. Being a schooling fish they will appreciate the company of their own kind, a standard school is made up of about 7 fish.

Black Convict Cichlid

The Black Convict Cichlid requires a 30 gallon minimum tank, with a gravel bottom, rocks and plenty of hiding places among the rocks or some inverted pots. Floating plants are recommended as a form of cover. Because of their aggressive nature, Black Convict Cichlids should only be housed with other more aggressive fish of the same size or larger.

Black Lyretail Molly

The Black Lyretail Molly prefers a tank of at least 30 gallons with plenty of strong plants such as Java Fern, Sagittaria, Vallisneria,and Anubias. They require a good filtration system because of their hearty appetites and resulting waste products. The Black Lyretail Molly is well suited for the community tank because of its peaceful nature, and is compatible with other peaceful, large fish that can withstand similar water conditions.

Black Molly

The Black Molly prefers a tank of at least 30 gallons with plenty of strong plants such as Java Fern, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, and Anubias. They require a good filtration system because of their hearty appetites and resulting waste products. The Black Molly is well suited for the community tank because of its peaceful nature, and is compatible with other peaceful, large fish that can withstand similar water conditions.

Black Neon Tetra

The distinct coloration of the Black Neon Tetra complements the shaded green and yellow hues of most freshwater plants. In turn, the plants offer hiding places for the Black Neon Tetra. The addition of rocks and driftwood also help mirror its natural habitat. The Black Neon Tetra thrives in slightly acidic water and will do best when water parameters are kept constant. The Black Neon Tetra is a schooling fish and will do best if kept in odd numbers of 5 or more.

Black Phantom Tetra

The Black Phantom Tetra is a very peaceful, schooling fish that comes from the regions of Central Brazil. Hiding spaces such as rocks, plants, and driftwood are recommended to give this fish a sense of security. Taller plants should be used to coincide with its mid-level swimming habits along with plenty of rock formed cave structures.

Black Shark

The Black Shark, also called the Black Labeo, is uniformly black or dark brown in color. In some countries it is an important food source. The Black Shark is a very active, somewhat aggressive fish that is not suitable for the community aquarium. A large aquarium is necessary for this shark as it may reach two feet in length.

Black Tetra

The Black Skirt Tetra is a very peaceful, schooling fish that comes from the regions of South America. Hiding spaces such as rocks, plants, and driftwood are recommended to give this fish a sense of security. Taller plants should be used to coincide with its mid-level swimming habits along with plenty of rock formed cave structures.

Bloodfin Tetra

Provide at least a 30-gallon aquarium, plants, rocks, and some driftwood to give this species hiding places and security. They require a steady slightly acidic pH and constant temperature. They are mid-level swimming fish so taller plants are ideal.

Blood Red Parrot

The Red Parrot requires an aquarium of at least 50 gallons, with a sandy bottom, rocks and plenty of hiding places among the rocks. Live plants should be planted in pots to protect the roots from these fish. The Red Parrot is generally peaceful with other fish of similar size, but can be timid or bullied by other Cichlids.

Blue Channel Cat

Channel catfish are commonly available in the aquarium trade as 3 to 4 inch youngsters. They will readilly consume many other fish species and grow large in tanks. They make good scavengers in large tanks with fish such as Plecostomus, Oscars, cichlids, silver dollars, large Goldfish, and other large varieties.

Blue Coral Platy

The Platy adds brilliant color to the aquarium and they are very easy to keep. These features make it a great fish for beginners and accomplished aquarists alike. The Platy requires an aquarium of at least 10 gallons that is densely planted with hardy plants like Java Fern and Java Moss. The Platy is a very peaceful fish and makes an excellent addition to the freshwater community aquarium. Any other peaceful fish can be housed with them.

Blue Fantail

Blue Fantail goldfish are popular because they are hardy fish and because their blue color sets them apart from the more common gold color. Goldfish are typically easy to care for. Blue Fantails in particular are able to withstand a wide variety of temperatures. They do well with other fancy goldfish varieties.

Blue Moon Platy

The Platy adds brilliant color to the aquarium and they are very easy to keep. These features make it a great fish for beginners and accomplished aquarists alike. The Platy requires an aquarium of at least 10 gallons that is densely planted with hardy plants like Java Fern and Java Moss. The Platy is a very peaceful fish and makes an excellent addition to the freshwater community aquarium. Any other peaceful fish can be housed with them.

Blue Paradise Gourami

The Blue Paradise requires a larger aquarium, at least 30 gallons, with lots of hiding places for the female. It will not eat plants, but because of its active courtship and mock battles between tank mates, only very hardy vegetation is advised. The Blue Paradise is a territorial fish that will defend its area from its tank mates. For this reason, it should only be kept with other large, semi-aggressive fish. It will also eat smaller tank mates. Adult males should be kept one per aquarium, as they fight as fiercely as Bettas.

Blue Spot Gourami

The Blue Gourami will be housed with a variety of tank mates that are of similar size and temperament. While males can be territorial with each other, they become timid around other, more aggressive fish. The ideal tank set-up would be an aquarium of a minimum of 20 gallons which has plenty of live plants as well as rocks and driftwood for use as hiding places.

Blushing Veil Angel

The Sunset Blushing has two doses of gold and two doses of Stripeless. The upper half of the fish exhibits orange on the best specimens. The body is mostly white in color, fins are clear. The amount of orange showing on the fish can vary. On some the body is a pinkish or tangerine color. The term blushing comes from the clear gill plates found on juveniles. You can see the pinkish gill underneath.

Boesemani Rainbow

This peaceful Rainbow is a schooling fish that does best in a planted aquarium with plenty of room to swim. If a dark gravel substrate is used, the gravel may aid in intensifying the colors of the Boesemani Rainbow. When maintaining a school of Boesemani Rainbow, an aquarium that is at least 4 feet in length should be used.

Bolivian Ram Cichlid

The Bolivian Ram requires a tank of 30 gallons minimum. The tank should have several dense plant groups and plenty of open swimming space. The Bolivian Ram also requires a few caves in which to hide in and stones to spawn on. Being a peaceful fish, the Bolivian Ram makes a wonderful addition to the community tank, is compatible with other peaceful fish.

Brick Swordtail

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

Buenos Aire Tetra

The Buenos Aires Tetra can be housed in an aquarium with other soft water fish. Tetras are a schooling fish that work well in groups of six or more fish of the same species. Artificial plants, rocks and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces. The Buenos Aires Tetra will eat most live plants, except Java Fern.

Bullhead Catfish

A fairly thick layer of gravel is appreciated by bullheads because they love to dig nests and dig for food. Sand and leaves make good substrate, and You must add hiding spots for the Bullhead like rock caves, hollow drift wood, or a thick forest of aquatic plants otherwise the bullhead will feel paranoid during day time and shy away from interesting means of feeding.

Bumblebee Goby

The ideal set-up is an aquarium with brackish water and plenty of plants and rocks providing the Gobies with ample hiding places. Although they do well in a community setting, they will thrive the best in the company of only their own species.

Burmese Sun Cat

Sun catfish usually hit the market at a little under two inches. Do not mix them with neon tetras. The little guys are nocturnal and/or shy. Little sun catfish usually disappear in a planted tank. You don’t see them for a while. When you spot them again, they’ve grown an inch. You can often coax them out with cichlid pellets or live California black worms.

Bushy Nose Pleco

Planted aquariums with hearty, fast-growing plants, high aeration, and water movement make for a healthy environment. Rocks and driftwood help to accent a natural habitat and provide hiding spaces to cut down on stress for the Bushy Nose Plecostomus. A recommended minimum tank of 30 gallons should be provided to house this fish.

Butterfly Koi

Butterfly Koi originated in the mid-20th century as a result of an effort to increase the hardiness of traditional koi. Japanese breeders interbred wild Indonesian Longfin river carp with traditional koi. The resulting fish had longer fins, long barbells, pompom nostrils, and were hardier than koi. These were known in Japan as "onagaoi" or "hire naga koi", or translated in English "long tail koi". They are also sometimes referred to as Dragon Koi. They do not get as big or live as long as normal Koi.

Calico Fantail

Related to carp, Goldfish prefer cool temperatures compared to Tropical Fish. Live plants are not the best option to have in a tank with this fish as they will nip at leaves, damaging a plant until it rots away. Calico Fantail Goldfish will also dig at the substrate creating divots and small valleys. These fish may also be candidates to keep in a pond as well, similar to Koi.

Calico Telescope

Unlike tropical fish, goldfish will live in a wide range of water temperatures. Most goldfish are peaceful and schooling fish that mix well with other goldfish. They come in a variety of striking colors with fascinating features like telescoping eyes and a veiltail. They are best suited for a larger aquarium with lots of filtration (e.g., outside power filter). The minimum aquarium size for two adult goldfish should be 29 gallons.

Checkered Barb

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Checkered Barb is a very timid fish that should be housed with fish of the same temperament.

Cherry Barb

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Cherry Barb is a very timid fish that should be housed with fish of the same temperament.

Chinese Algae Eater

A minimum of a 30-gallon aquarium is recommended with plenty of plants, rocks, and driftwood for hiding. It can handle different water conditions but water quality should remain constant to avoid stress. In smaller community tanks the Chinese Algae Eater will defend its territory. This species of algae eater can become aggressive when they become full grown.

Dalmation Lyretail Molly

The Dalmation Lyretail Molly requires an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with algae and plenty of room to swim. The tall dorsal fin of the male will not develop if adequate room is not provided for him to swim. Dalmation Lyretail Molly should only share an aquarium with other peaceful fish that prefer hard water with elevated salt levels.

Diamond Tetra

These Tetras prefer a heavily planted tank and softer water on the acidic side. They are ideal fish to put in a community tank and prefer to school with an odd number of at least 3 Diamond Tetras, making them an attractive addition to your home aquarium.

Discus

Depending on sub-species, the natural range of the Discus extends from the Amazon to the Rio Negro Regions of South America. The Discus requires an advanced level of care due to its feeding habits and water filtration requirements. Territorial during spawning, this otherwise peaceful fish is among the schooling group, forming a well-defined nuclear family.

Duboisi Cichlid

The Tropheus Duboisi Cichlid should be maintained in an aquarium of at least 50 gallons, in a large number of the same species, or with other smaller semi-aggressive Tanganyikan or Malawian cichlids. Incorporate plenty of rocks and African driftwood in order to build caves. Provide a sandy bottom of aragonite to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

Dwarf Blue Gourami

Dwarf Gouramis require a tank that is 10 gallons or larger. The aquarium should be heavily planted and have at least part of the surface covered with floating plants. A darker substrate will help show-off the gourami's colors, and peat filtration is recommended. Regular water changes are a must, as this gourami can be susceptible to disease. They should not be kept with large, aggressive fish, but are compatible with other small, peaceful fish as well as fellow gouramis. Loud noises often scare them, so the tank should be in a quiet area.

Dwarf Red Gourami

Dwarf Gouramis require a tank that is 10 gallons or larger. The aquarium should be heavily planted and have at least part of the surface covered with floating plants. A darker substrate will help show-off the gourami's colors, and peat filtration is recommended. Regular water changes are a must, as this gourami can be susceptible to disease. They should not be kept with large, aggressive fish, but are compatible with other small, peaceful fish as well as fellow gouramis. Loud noises often scare them, so the tank should be in a quiet area.

Electric Blue Johanni

These fish are a dark blue coloration with lighter blue horizonal stripes. The females will have lighter color bellies and shorter pelvic fins. A large aquarium with plenty of caves and hiding places is ideal for these fish. An aragonite-based substrate is recommended in order to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity.

Fancy Angel

The fins are thin and typically, will extend the length of the body. It prefers a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming.

Fancy Guppy

The Fancy Guppy is also very hardy and quick to mature, which makes it attractive to both beginning and advanced hobbyists. Because of its hardiness, it is tolerant of small changes in water parameters. However, care should be taken to keep temperature, pH, and nutrient levels in check. The Fancy Guppy is a very peaceful fish and should be housed with freshwater tankmates of similar temperament.

Female Betta

Betta splendens is often referred to as Fighting Fish or "Siamese" Fighting Fish, since it has been bred over the years to be both colorful and combative, especially towards other males. As such, only one male Betta should be kept in an aquarium. However, smaller, shorter-finned - though often equally as colorful - females may be housed together with caution. The Betta should be housed with peaceful fish that will not nip at the Betta's glorious, flowing fins.

Firemouth Meeki

The Firemouth Cichlid requires a tank of a minimum of 30 gallons, with a fine sand bottom for burrowing and plenty of open swimming room. Plants should be hardy, like Sagittaria, and potted with their root surfaces protected. There should also be rocks available, as they like to hide among the rocks and roots. They do get territorial during spawning and will harass smaller tank mates of their own species, so keeping fish that are similar in size is recommended.

Giant Danio

Because the Giant Danio is such an active fish, it requires a large aquarium with ample swimming room. A hood should always be installed on the aquarium housing these fish, as they like to jump. Giant Danios should be kept in a group consisting of five or more fish.

Glass Catfish

Ghost Glass Cats, also known as Indian Ghosts, Ghost Fish, Glass Catfish, or Glass Cats, are very peaceful, and a great community fish that will give their caretakers hours of enjoyment. Ghost or glass-like in appearance, the Ghost Glass Cat loves a low light condition and is most active during dawn and dusk. As a true schooling fish, it needs other Ghost Glass Cats in the aquarium in order to survive and thrive.

Glofish

Fluorescent GloFish are the first designer-bred Danios (Zebra Fish) to come in five neon colors: Starfire Red, Electric Green, Sunburst Orange, Cosmic Blue and Galactic Purple.For best care, keep this peaceful fish by themselves in small aquariums or in small schools with equally non-aggressive fish. Since they are omnivores, feed GloFish a varied diet of flake and frozen foods.

Glow Light Tetra

Glowlight Tetras add beauty to a planted aquarium; the plants, in turn, will provide hiding places for the fish. Rocks and driftwood also help to mirror its natural habitat. It thrives in slightly acidic water and will do best when water parameters are kept constant. The Glowlight Tetras are a schooling fish and are very interesting to watch in action when kept in odd numbers of five or more.

Gold Gourami

The Gold Gourami can be housed with a variety of tank mates that are of similar size and temperament. While males can be territorial with each other, they become timid around other, more aggressive fish. The ideal tank set-up would be an aquarium of a minimum of 20 gallons and have plenty of live plants as well as rocks and driftwood for use as hiding places.

Gold Molly

The Gold Dust Molly prefers hard, alkaline water conditions and may not thrive in aquariums with acidic or soft water. The Gold Dust Molly requires an aquarium of at least 30 gallons with algae and plenty of room to swim. The Gold Dust Molly should only share an aquarium with other peaceful fish that prefer hard water with elevated salt levels.

Gold Severum Cichlid

The Gold Severum requires a 30 gallon or larger tank that is at least 40 inches long and 20 inches tall. The larger the tank the better. They prefer a lightly-planted tank with a soft bottom and a few rooted plants. Adding a few large rocks would be appropriate as long as there is still plenty of open room for swimming. The Gold Severum can be aggressive when spawning, and for this reason should only be housed with other semi-aggressive fish.

Green Cory Cat

It inhabits waters with high vegetation and neutral pH. A minimum aquarium size of 30 gallons is recommend for the Emerald Green Cory. To replicate the natural habitat of this catfish, the aquarium should be well planted with plenty of driftwood. Maintain a pH close to neutral and provide strong filtration to ensure proper health.

Green Kisser Gourami

The Kissing Gourami requires a 30-gallon or larger tank, with stones and plants. Plastic plants are best because they will eat most all vegetation in the aquarium, although Java Fern and possibly Java Moss may also be used. There is no need to clean the back of the aquarium because the Kissing Gourami will browse on the algae that is growing there. The Kissing Gourami is peaceful with other fish of similar size and will tolerate others of the same species.

Green Leopard Synodontis

Since multipunctatus came from Lake Tanganyika, you know they prefer a high pH. Word of caution: Organics (ammonia and nitrite) present a huge problem at high pH levels. Make frequent and large water changes if you expect to keep these guys. Ditto with your African cichlids. Since both these types of fish eat (and digest) great quantities of food, they can be their own worst enemies. Change their water often.

Green Swordtail

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

Green Texas Cichlid

Green Texas Cichlids require a tank of at least 50 gallons with lots of room to swim and adequate hiding spots. Most plants that are added to the aquarium will be uprooted as they dig, so floating plants may be more appropriate. They are very adaptable to differences in water chemistry. Being aggressive in nature, the Green Texas Cichlid should only be housed with more aggressive fish that are close to the same size.

Green Tiger Barb

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Green Tiger Barb is a very active fish that may pester or even nip the fins of larger, slower moving fish.

Harlequin Rasbora

The Harlequin Rasbora does best in an established planted aquarium with open areas for swimming. The Harlequin Rasbora should be kept in schools of 8-10 individuals and housed with other small, peaceful fish. The mild nature of the Harlequin Rasbora makes it a great community fish.

Heckelii Cichlid

Keep this fish in a spacious aquaria with easy to defend territories and TOUGH plants. This fish is undemandig when it comes to water chemistry and will eat just about any food you give it. Only Keep other fish which can stick up for itself.

Hifin Blue Danio

Native to the Ganges region in Eastern India, wild Danios are found in a variety of habitats, ranging from fast-moving streams to slow-moving, nearly stagnant ponds. In the home aquarium, this member of the Cyprinidae family prefers a well-planted aquarium with large, open swimming areas. For the best care, keep the peaceful Danio in small schools with equally non-aggressive fish. Since they are omnivores, feed the Danio a varied diet of flake and frozen foods.

Hifin Leopard Danio

Native to the Ganges region in Eastern India, wild Danios are found in a variety of habitats, ranging from fast-moving streams to slow-moving, nearly stagnant ponds. In the home aquarium, this member of the Cyprinidae family prefers a well-planted aquarium with large, open swimming areas. For the best care, keep the peaceful Danio in small schools with equally non-aggressive fish. Since they are omnivores, feed the Danio a varied diet of flake and frozen foods.

Iridescent Shark

These fish can be quite nervous are easily spooked, and have very bad eyesight. Not recommended for home aquaria because of the large size they attain. These fish should be kept in a large aquarium with thick glass or acrylic because these fish are powerful and can break most glass when they get large. The iridescent shark is a shoaling catfish which should be kept in groups to relieve stress.

Jack Dempsey Cichlid

The Jack Dempsey requires an aquarium of at least 50-gallons, with a fine sand bottom. There should be rocks and roots for them to hide among. The plants should be hardy as the Jack Dempsey will burrow around and attack them. The aquarium should be divided into territories using hardy plants, if possible. They are territorial and will eat smaller fish that they can swallow.

Jewel Cichlid

Reclusive; Territorial and at times vicious. Controlling this fish's temper requires careful stocking plans. When not actively breeding they are often relatively peaceful, causing non-cichlid species of equal or greater size few problems, with only a slight hint of dominance at feeding times. Rather amusingly, they sometimes guard food, or actually grab it and run away with it.

Kerri Tetra

This is just a sample picture to illustrate a potential end user layout. The picture is of an old Opaline Gourami tank. Opaline and three spot Gourami are sometimes said to be a peaceful community fish, but in my experience they are aggressive. More than one male and not enough space for territory will result in injuries.

Kribensis Cichlid

This is one of the smaller African Cichlids, and is often referred to as a dwarf Cichlid. The Kribensis Cichlid is ideally kept in a 50-gallon or larger aquarium decorated with plenty of rocks and caves in order to provide adequate hiding places for these territorial fish.

Lemon Tetra

These fish, like all tetras, are best kept in schools of six or more. Any fewer, and they may become nervous and stressed. The Lemon Tetra is a delightful Characin, and displays interesting behavior. In particular, males are very fun to watch. This tetra is very hardy and will thrive in just about any tank, regardless of water type.

Male Betta

Betta splendens is often referred to as Fighting Fish or "Siamese" Fighting Fish, since it has been bred over the years to be both colorful and combative, especially towards other males. As such, only one male Betta should be kept in an aquarium. However, smaller, shorter-finned - though often equally as colorful - females may be housed together with caution. The Betta should be housed with peaceful fish that will not nip at the Betta's glorious, flowing fins.

Marigold Swag Swordtail

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

Montezuma Swordtail

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

Neon Dwarf Rainbow

Not too demanding, if given the proper requirements. Very hardy. Should be kept in schools of at least two males to several females to show their best colors and activity. These fish will do great in a live planted tank.

Neon Tetra

Native to the clear water streams of South America, the Neon Tetra prefers densely planted systems with plenty of low light areas to hide. To best recreate its natural habitat, place rocks and driftwood amongst the plants for added areas of refuge. However, the Neon Tetra will tend to swim or remain suspended in the water column in schools to create a breathtaking display of color. Extremely peaceful, the Neon Tetra should be kept with similarly non-aggressive tankmates of a similar size.

Nicaraguensis Cichlid

A great alternative to more aggressive large new world cichlids, popular because of their stunning colours and nice disposition. They make a wonderful species tank in a large group.

Odessa Barb

They do prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Scarlet Barb is a very active fish that may pester or even nip the fins of larger, slower moving fish.

Opaline Gourami

The Opaline Gourami is compatible with a variety of tank mates that are of similar size and temperament. While males can be territorial with each other, they become timid around other, more aggressive fish. The ideal tank set-up would be a minimum of 20 gallons and have plenty of live plants as well as rocks and driftwood for use as hiding places.

Ornate Rainbow

Not too demanding, if given the proper requirements. Very hardy. Should be kept in schools of at least two males to several females to show their best colors and activity. Though this fish usually only gets about 12cm in the aquarium, it has the potential to reach its full size of 15 cm in length. And thus, they will need some room to swim, so it is highly recommended that they not be kept in anything smaller than a 55 gal aquarium. These fish will do great in a live planted tank.

Oscar

The Oscar requires a large aquarium of at least 70 gallons with a deep sand bottom and a few large rocks. They will dig up plants; so any that are in the tank should be potted with the root surfaces covered with rocks. Using floating plants is a good compromise to this problem. Tiny Oscars form a tight cluster for protection and this is normal behavior for juvenile fish. Large Oscars are not as territorial as most other cichlids when full grown but will consume anything they can fit into their mouths.

Painted Fruit Tetra

Painted tetras can usually be obtained in a wide range of pastel colors. Many pet stores give the fishes names after similarly colored fruits, hence the name Fruit tetras. You can for instance find Grape tetra, Blueberry tetra and Strawberry tetra. During recent years it has even been possible to obtain Holiday tetras that have been dyed to fit the upcoming holiday, e.g. red Christmas tetras and blue and red 4th of July tetras.

Painted Glass Tetra

Painted tetras can usually be obtained in a wide range of pastel colors. Many pet stores give the fishes names after similarly colored fruits, hence the name Fruit tetras. You can for instance find Grape tetra, Blueberry tetra and Strawberry tetra. During recent years it has even been possible to obtain Holiday tetras that have been dyed to fit the upcoming holiday, e.g. red Christmas tetras and blue and red 4th of July tetras.

Painted Tetra

Painted tetras can usually be obtained in a wide range of pastel colors. Many pet stores give the fishes names after similarly colored fruits, hence the name Fruit tetras. You can for instance find Grape tetra, Blueberry tetra and Strawberry tetra. During recent years it has even been possible to obtain Holiday tetras that have been dyed to fit the upcoming holiday, e.g. red Christmas tetras and blue and red 4th of July tetras.

Paleatus Cory Cat

The Peppered Cory Cat requires a well-planted aquarium with plenty of hiding places that provide relief from the light. A smooth sand or gravel substrate is needed because of the easily damaged barbels. They enjoy being in numbers, so a small school of six or more is ideal for these cats.

Panda Cory Cat

The Panda Cory Cat requires a well planted aquarium with plenty of hiding places that provide relief from the light. A smooth sand or gravel substrate is needed because of the easily damaged barbels. They enjoy being in numbers, so a small school of six or more is ideal for these cats.

Pearl Leeri Gourami

The Pearl Gourami requires a 30 gallon or larger tank with water approximately 12 inches deep, and a covering of floating ferns that may be used as hiding places. The substrate should be dark and the light subdued. The ideal tank mates for the Pearl Gourami would be similar in size and temperament. They should not be housed with aggressive tank mates, like Cichlids. They will hide in a corner, begin to loose color and may refuse to eat if kept with overly aggressive fish.

Penguin Tetra

The Penguin Tetra can be housed in an aquarium with other soft water fish. Tetras are a schooling fish that work well in groups of six or more fish of the same species. Live plants, rocks and driftwood help to enhance its natural habitat and provide hiding spaces.

Petricola Synodontis

Synodontis petricola should be kept in larger tanks, with hard alkaline water. It is well suited to be kept combined with african cichlids, and livebearers, although smaller fish are often eaten. Synodontis petricola can be kept single, although it's better to keep the fish in small groups of 3-4 animals. Some free swimming space is required, and the feeding area is best contructed with a sandbed, to protect the barbs of the fish.

Pineapple Swordtail

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

Pink Convict Cichlid

The Pink Convict Cichlid requires a minimum tank of 30 gallons with a gravel bottom, rocks and plenty of hiding places among the rocks or some inverted pots. Floating plants are recommended as a form of cover. Because of their aggressive nature, Pink Convict Cichlids should only be housed with other more aggressive fish of the same size or larger.

Platinum Gourami

Generally, if the tank the gourami is being housed in is of adequate size (about 35 gallons or more, depending on the actual setup), the gourami makes a good aquarium inhabitant. In small or crowded setups, the Blue Gourami may become aggressive towards other fish.

Pleco

Planted aquariums with hearty, fast-growing plants, high aeration, and water movement make for a healthy environment. Rocks and driftwood help to accent a natural habitat and provide hiding spaces to reduce stress for the Sailfin Pleco. A recommended minimum tank of 125 gallons should be provided to house this fish.

Pool Comet

Relatively easy to keep, common varieties are hardier than most breeds. Goldfish are very active fish and require plenty of swimming room, so prospective goldfish owners need to accomodate that. Medium to large ponds are best, as they afford the fish much more room than most tanks. If kept in a tank a very large tank is required, with excellent filtration and frequent water changes.

Praecox Rainbow

A planted aquarium with plenty of free swimming places available will provide a good environment for Melanotaenia praecox. A dark colored gravel substrate may intensify the Praecox Rainbow's colors.

Purple Passion

Known to be some of the hardiest of the commonly available freshwater fish. Though they appreciate lightly to moderately decorated tanks, they seem to be happy in bare aquariums as well. This species should be kept in schools of at least eight fish, to provide a large enough social group.

Rainbow Cichlid

The Rainbow Cichlid requires a minimum tank of 50 gallons with a fine gravel bottom, and rocks and roots for hiding. Hardy, well-rooted plants are recommended, as well as upturned pots and shards for additional hiding places. The Rainbow Cichlid does not usually burrow, so most plantscapes should stay in place. They are a peaceful fish that is territorial and rarely aggressive, except during spawning. It can easily be kept with other medium-sized cichlids such as Convicts, Firemouths, and Parrots.

Rainbow Shark

The Rainbow Shark is a beautifully colored fish which is a dark gray to black with red fins. It requires a large aquarium with driftwood, rocks, and spots of dense vegetation. This shark may set up territories around the aquarium. The Rainbow Shark will become very aggressive towards its own species.

Red American Fantail

As a member of the carp family, the Red Fantail Goldfish is generally quite hardy. It does well in aquariums 30 gallons or larger, as well as backyard garden ponds of 180 gallons or more. In addition to a fine gravel bottom or well-rounded river rocks, the Red Fantail will appreciate hardy, cold water plants. Keep in mind that goldfish are diggers and will scatter the fine sand onto leaves, injuring thin and less hardy plants.

Red Tail Guppy

One of the many color variations of Poecilia reticulata, the farm-raised Red Fire Guppy requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons. Because of its hardiness, it is tolerant of small changes in water parameters. However, care should be taken to keep temperature, pH, and nutrient levels in check. The Red Fire Guppy is a very peaceful fish and should be housed with freshwater tankmates of similar temperament.

Red Eye Tetra

The Red Eye Tetra has a natural tolerance to a wide range of water parameters. This characteristic makes the Red Eye Tetra well suited for a variety of aquarium setups including the community aquarium. Unlike sensitive tetra species that need to be kept in soft water conditions, the hardy Red Eye Tetra is an excellent choice for new aquarists. Furthermore, the Red Eye Tetra is very peaceful and is compatible with other non-aggressive fish.

Red Glass Rosy Barb

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Rosy Barb is a schooling fish and enjoys being in numbers. If in a large enough school, they typically will not bother any other fish in the aquarium.

Synspilum Cichlid

Adult females will max out at around a foot in length, while the much heavier, longer males will develop a pronounced so-called, 'nuchal hump' with size and dominance. This omnivorous species will show it's best coloration and appreciate a large variety of high quality, veggie based foods as the foundation of it's diet. Stock as an established, compatible pair, if more than one is to be kept in the aquarium to avoid aggression problems.

Red N Blue Columbian Tetra

A planted aquarium of at least 20 gallons will be the ideal environment for the Red/Blue Columbian Tetra. Rocks and driftwood help mirror its natural habitat and will help to reduce stress on this fish. This species does best with soft slightly acidic water with high filtration.

Red Sunset Sailfin Molly

Native to fresh and brackish coastal waters of North America, Sailfin Mollies are commonly found in shallow waters along marshes, streams, ponds, and swamps. In the home aquarium, they should be kept in well-planted systems with open swimming areas and plenty of hiding locations among plants for pregnant females.

Red Tail Black Shark

The Redtail Shark is a beautiful fish with a jet black body and a bright red tail. The dorsal fin is marked with a white tip. It requires a large aquarium with driftwood, rocks, and spots of dense vegetation. This shark may set up territories around the aquarium. The Redtail Shark will become very aggressive towards its own species when mature.

Red Terror Cichlid

The Red Terror requires an aquarium of at least 50 gallons, with a sandy bottom, and rock work that will provide plenty of hiding spots. Live plants should be planted in pots to protect the roots from these fish. The Red Terror is generally peaceful with other fish of similar size, but can get more territorial as it matures.

Red Wag Platy

The Red Platy adds bold color to the aquarium and is very easy to keep. These features make it a great fish for beginners and accomplished aquarists alike. The Red Platy requires an aquarium of at least 10 gallons that is densely planted with hardy plants like Java Fern and Java Moss. The Red Platy is a very peaceful fish and makes an excellent addition to the freshwater community aquarium.

Red Zebra Cichlid

It does not have notable stripes like other varieties of this genus and species. Metriaclima estherae is a Mbuna Cichlid, and is also called the Zebra Cichlid, Tilapia Zebra, and the False Zebra Mbuna.
A bully by nature, without plenty of room, pyramids, rocks and crevasses to establish territory, Red Zebra will torment other tank mates.

Rosy Barb

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Rosy Barb is a schooling fish and enjoys being in numbers. If in a large enough school, they typically will not bother any other fish in the aquarium.

Sarassa Comet

The Sarasa Comet is originally from China and over the years it has been distributed worldwide. The ideal setup for the hardy Sarasa Comet is a pond of at least 180 gallons with a gravel substrate, rocks, and cold-hardy plants. The Sarasa Comet will tend to grow in proportion to its surroundings. It likes to eat the roots of plants and will dig to get to them, so provide large rocks around the base of the plants to protect the plants. Adequate filtration should be provided in order to maintain proper water conditions.

Scissortail Rasbora

The Scissortail Rasbora is a peaceful and easy-to-care-for fish displayed best in schools. In the wild, the Scissortail Rasbora can grow up to 6" in length. It is important to house the Scissortail Rasbora in an established aquarium that has open areas for swimming. The Scissortail Rasbora adds activity and visual interest to the upper regions of the aquarium. Use a tight-fitting cover or glass canopy to contain these potential jumpers.

Serpae Tetra

The hardy Red Minor Serpae Tetra is great for the community aquarium. Hiding spaces such as rocks, plants, and driftwood are recommended to give this fish a sense of security. Taller plants should be used to coincide with its mid-level swimming habits along with plenty of rock formed cave structures.

Shubunkin

The ideal setup for the Shubunkin is a pond of at least 180 gallons with a gravel substrate, rocks, and hearty plants. This fish will grow in proportion to the size of its surroundings. They like to eat the roots of plants and will dig to get to them, so provide large rocks around the base of the plants to protect them. Adequate filtration should be provided in order to maintain proper water conditions.

Silver Dollar

A tank of at least 30 gallons will be the ideal environment for this characin. Silver Dollars are a lively schooling fish and best kept in groups of three or more. Rocks, plants, and driftwood help mirror its natural habitat and will help to reduce stress on the fish, though plastic plants may be necessary due to their herbivorous nature. They do best in soft, slightly acidic water with high filtration.

Silver Dollar Tetra

This is just a sample picture to illustrate a potential end user layout. The picture is of an old Opaline Gourami tank. Opaline and three spot Gourami are sometimes said to be a peaceful community fish, but in my experience they are aggressive. More than one male and not enough space for territory will result in injuries.

Silver Molly

The Silver Molly prefers a tank of at least 30 gallons with plenty of strong plants such as Java Fern, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, and Anubias. They require a good filtration system because of their hearty appetites and resulting waste products. The Silver Molly is well suited for the community tank because of its peaceful nature, and is compatible with other peaceful, large fish that can withstand similar water conditions.

Silvertip Tetra

Silver Tip Tetras are best kept in schools of six or more, because they are schooling fish. These tetras become very beautiful when kept in a tank with good lighting, as it makes their colors shine.

Skunk Botia

The Skunk Botia Loach is an active scavenger that is a semi-aggressive fish that enjoys the company of its own species, or other semi-aggressive fish. It will school with others of the same age and size. The skunk Botia Loach appreciates caves, holes, and other places to hide, especially when it sleeps. Because it originates from streams, it requires water currents in the aquarium.

Socofoli Cichlid

Keep one male to 5 females. Overstocking the aquarium may help to suppress the worst aggression. Requires stone formations that allow the fish good hiding places (one per fish) and free areas to swim on. Don’t use roots in your aquarium since they lower PH levels.

Spotted Puffer

Although often sold as a brackish or freshwater fish, this species requires full saltwater conditions as an adult to really thrive. Feed ghost shrimp, snails, tubifex worms, bloodworms, and krill. Has been known to eat some plant matter. All puffers should be fed shelled food once a week to keep the growth of their teeth under control. Prefers hard alkaline water.

Standard Koi

The ideal setup for Koi is a 1000+ gallon pond with a fine gravel substrate, rocks, and hardy plants. Because these Koi savor plant roots and will dig to get to them, be sure to place large rocks around the base of plants to protect them. You will also need to provide adequate filtration to maintain proper water conditions.

Sunburst Platy

The Red Platy adds bold color to the aquarium and is very easy to keep. These features make it a great fish for beginners and accomplished aquarists alike. The Red Platy requires an aquarium of at least 10 gallons that is densely planted with hardy plants like Java Fern and Java Moss. The Red Platy is a very peaceful fish and makes an excellent addition to the freshwater community aquarium.

Sunset Swordtail

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

Tiger Barb

They prefer a well-planted tank of at least 30 gallons with soft, slightly acidic water. Rocks and driftwood can be added to the aquarium, but leave plenty of space for swimming. The Tiger Barb is a very active fish that may pester or even nip the fins of larger, slower moving fish.

Tinfoil Barb

The Tinfoil Barb is a very hardy fish and compared to other barbs, quite docile in nature. This peaceful demeanor and glittery body make the Tinfoil Barb an attractive addition to the large community aquarium. As a schooling fish, the Tinfoil Barb should be kept in a group of at least 6 or more individuals with other non-aggressive large fish.

Titanium Thai Silk Flowerhorn

Thought to be a cross between Severums and some other South American cichlid, the general body shape is like the Cichlasoma festae. Available in many color morphs, the Flower Horn has been developed to exhibit lots of colors in the head and body regions. As a cichlid, the Flower Horn is somewhat aggressive, especial towards other cichlid species. This fish is best kept in pairs or harems to avoid overly aggressive males.

Tri-Color Shark

It requires a large aquarium with driftwood, rocks, and spots of dense vegetation. This shark does best in small groups of 3 or more, as they prefer to school in the aquarium. Unfortunately, the breeding habits of the Bala Shark have not been documented.

True Flying Fox

The Flying Fox Algae Eater is a great fish for the community aquarium. It prefers a planted aquarium with many broad-leaved plants on which it can rest on. It also requires these plants and rocks for grazing algae. This species can be kept with a variety of tank mates including more passive community fish.

Turquiose Rainbow

This schooling fish should be housed in a planted aquarium, but not too densely planted that there is insufficient free-swimming space as these are active fish. The Turquiose Rainbow requires a gravel substrate and you may find that their colors intensify with a dark colored gravel.

Upside Down Synodontis

The Upside Down Cat will appreciate a heavily planted aquarium of 30 gallons or more, with driftwood and crevices for hiding. Sensitive to nitrates, good water conditions are necessary. It prefers a current in the aquarium. It can be kept as a schooling fish or in an aquarium with other small Synodontis species.

Velvet Swordtail

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

Velvet Wag Swordtail

The Swordtail requires an aquarium of at least 20 gallons that is well planted with plenty of room for swimming. Because of its peaceful nature, the Swordtail is well suited for the community aquarium. However, the male Swordtail can demonstrate territorial aggression towards other male Swordtails so care should be taken when housing more than one male. Also, the Swordtail is an accomplished jumper, so be sure to provide a secure cover for the aquarium.

Venustus Cichlid

The Venustus Cichlid requires a large aquarium with plenty of caves, hiding spots and places to set up territories. The ideal aquarium setup will consist of many pieces of stacked rock with a sandy aragonite based substrate which is needed to maintain the necessary high pH and alkalinity. These cichlids are very sensitive to levels of nitrates and therefore regular water changes will be needed for their optimal health.

Von Rio Tetra

Excellent for community tanks. A bit timid and will lose coloration after many disturbances. For this reason, these fish are not very popular in active stores. Once they are added into a tank and they have settled in, their coloration will appear much better.

White Cloud Tetra

This easy to keep minnow will do well in the community aquarium with other peaceful fish. If kept in a school of eight or more, the White Cloud will be more active and colorful.

Yoyo Loach

The Lohachata Botia Loach is an active scavenger that is a semi-aggressive fish that enjoys the company of its own species, or other semi-aggressive fish. It will school with others of the same age and size. The Lohachata Botia Loach appreciates caves, holes, and other places to hide, especially when it sleeps. Because it originates from streams, it requires water currents in the aquarium.

Zebra Danio

Native to the Ganges region in Eastern India, wild Zebra Danios are found in a variety of habitats, ranging from fast-moving streams to slow-moving, nearly stagnant ponds. In the home aquarium, this member of the Cyprinidae family prefers a well-planted aquarium with large open swimming areas. For best care, keep this peaceful fish in small schools with equally non-aggressive fish. Since they are omnivores, feed the Zebra Danio a varied diet of flake and frozen foods.

Saltwater Fish

Bangaii Cardinal

Banggaii cardinals get along with their own kind, as well as with other peaceful tank mates. However, two males should not be kept together as they will fight. They like to be seen in the open at all times, and will get to recognize you when you enter the room. They can sometimes be shy when first introduced to a new tank, but it quickly goes away.

Bi-Color Angel

A minimum of a 30 gallon tank with lots of hiding places and live rock for grazing will offer an environment in which to thrive. Not a good reef dweller, the Bicolor Angelfish is prone to nip at stony and soft corals (sessile invertebrates) and clam mantles.

Cleaner Shrimp

The Cleaner Shrimp prefers a habitat providing it with a cave or overhang where the lighting is not too intense. While it will tolerate its mate, others of its own kind will be chased away or harassed. It is generally peaceful with most other organisms in the reef system unless they impinge on its territory. It will set up cleaning stations and remove dead tissue and parasites from fish that present themselves. It will also scavenge for meaty bits along the substrate bottom. Often, only its antennae will be visible. It will not tolerate copper or high levels of nitrates in the aquarium, but will require correct levels of iodine in the water to promote proper molting.

Cleaner Wrasse

When first introduced into the aquarium, live saltwater feeder shrimp should be used to entice this fish to eat. It may accept substitute foods such as chopped seafoods, brine shrimp, and live black worms. It should be fed at least three times daily. This species of Cleaner Wrasse is more hardy than the others, but is still difficult to feed and maintain, and should only be kept by experienced aquarists.

Clown Fairy Wrasse

The Red Head Solon Fairy Wrasse will thrive in either a fish-only or reef aquarium of 75 gallons or larger. It needs a shaded area away from the bright lights. They will not bother corals or invertebrates, making them an ideal fish for the reef aquarium. These wrasse like to jump, so a tight fitting canopy is recommended.

Coral Banded Shrimp

Though the Banded Coral Shrimp can be aggressive towards other Banded Coral Shrimp and smaller shrimp of different species, most are peaceful towards fish, corals, and invertebrates within your aquarium. Because of its aggressive disposition towards other Banded Coral Shrimp, the Banded Coral Shrimp should be housed individually or kept as a true mated pair.

Coral Striped Angel

Like the other dwarf angels you'll want to keep only one of these Eibli Angelfish per tank because they will fight with other dwarf angelfish. Provide plenty of hiding places for them and they should be out and about more often. They have the reputation of being very shy. Keeping them in a reef tank setup may not be a good idea. They might nip clam mantles and corals.

Diamond Butterfly

Use caution when selecting tank mates. Avoid keeping a Diamond Butterfly Fish with other butterfly fish and they may not be a good choice for saltwater reef tanks. May nip at soft corals. Try to keep them with some of the more peaceful marine species.

Dwarf Lionfish

Despite its flamboyant appearance, the Dwarf Lionfish is a docile and shy creature that spends most of its time hiding among rocks and corals. It is very important to include plenty of good hiding spots in the aquarium; otherwise your lionfish can become even more shy and withdrawn.

Green Bird Wrasse

A 125 gallon or larger aquarium with large amounts of live rock which furnish food and hiding places provides a good environment. Because the Bird Wrasse is a "jumper," a tight-fitting lid on the tank is necessary. If a pair of Bird Wrasse are to be included in a tank, the female should be introduced first.

Green Bubble Anenome

An interesting aspect of this creature is its ability to maintain a symbiotic relationship with the Clown fish, which can "host" the anenome by providing it with defence against predators and also providing some nourishment. In turn, the anenome provides the Clown fish with shelter.

Green Chromis

In the home aquarium, the Blue Green Reef Chromis does best in similar environments and will actively swim at all levels of the aquarium water column. In fact, small schools of the Blue Green Reef Chromis add a dazzling and dramatic shimmer of beauty to almost any well-established reef system.

Humu Humu Trigger

A 70 gallon or larger aquarium with rocks and caves provides a good habitat. It will rearrange the landscaping and rocks as it wanders in and out of the caves. It vocalizes using a "grunting" sound. The Humu Picasso Triggerfish makes a great conversation piece.

Keyhole Angel

Somewhat drab when compared to most other angelfish, the Keyhole Angelfish is primarily a dull blue to brownish-blue. The pelvic and lower portion of the anal fins are yellow. The egg-shaped, white vertical bar found in the mid-central body area gives it its name. Keyhole Angelfish grows up to 8 inches. The Keyhole Angel prefers a tank of at least 40 gallons with plenty of places to hide & swim. It may nip at stony and soft corals (sessile invertebrates) and clam mantles. It will also feed on filamentous algae and diatoms.

Kole Tang

A 70 gallon or larger aquarium is necessary to provide plenty of swimming room. It is aggressive towards other Tangs, therefore, it is best to only keep one per tank. It will not harm sessile invertebrates in the reef tank environment.

Koran Angel

It is not advisable to keep adult Koran Angelfish in aquariums smaller than 100 gallons / 375 liters. Large specimens (35-40 cm/ 14-15 in) will need even bigger aquariums. The aquarium should contain plenty of live rock to allow the fish to carry out its normal grazing behavior in captivity. Include plenty of suitable hiding spots in the set up.

Long Tentacled Anemone

It has a similar appearance to Heteractis crispa, which has more tentacles and a tougher column. Its oral disc is usually visible and can grow up to 20" in diameter. Its tentacles are spaced further apart than other similar anemones. It is found in various forms and color patterns, but its base is usually orange to red. It is a host to clownfish, usually Amphiprion perideraion and A. clarki.

Niger Trigger

The Niger Triggerfish requires a 180 gallon or larger aquarium with rocks and caves for hiding, and may rearrange the landscaping and rocks. It vocalizes using a "grunting" sound. They are a great active fish for the more aggressive, fish-only display.

Ocellaris Clown

The Tank-Bred Ocellaris Clownfish has other unique advantages over wild-caught species. For one, the Tank-Bred Ocellaris Clownfish is very hardy and more accustomed to conditions found in home aquariums. Therefore, it makes a great choice for novices and seasoned aquarists alike. The Tank-Bred Ocellaris Clownfish can also be kept with a variety of other tank-bred clownfish, if introduced into the aquarium at the same time.

Orange Spot Diamond Goby

It should be housed in a 30 gallon or larger aquarium with live sand as the substrate, and an attached populated refugium. The Diamond Watchman Goby uses shallow burrows in the substrate as refuge, keeping the substrate well oxygenated. It rarely becomes aggressive towards other fish, but is territorial, and will fight with its own kind unless they are a mated pair.

Pajama Cardinal

For the best care, the Spotted Cardinalfish should be kept in small schools in suitably sized aquariums of at least 30 gallons. Because the Spotted Cardinalfish is a slow and methodical swimmer, it should be housed with peaceful tankmates and offered a plethora of hiding places amongst rockwork or plants. Most Spotted Cardinalfish will tend to hide in sea grass or other plants. Some may also camouflage themselves against long spined sea urchins.

Peppermint Shrimp

The Peppermint Shrimp does best in home aquariums with live rock, ample places to hide, as well as open areas to scavenge. Peppermint Shrimp are very social and peaceful towards most reef inhabitants. Like other invertebrates, the Peppermint Shrimp cannot tolerate copper-based medications or high nitrate levels. It also requires supplemental iodine to encourage proper molting of its carapace.

Royal Dottyback Psuedo

A 30 gallon or larger aquarium should be provided. The Bicolor Dottyback will not be intimidated by other fish and will defend its territory against fish two to three times its size. It will also eat ornamental shrimp and is a predator of nuisance bristleworms.

Sailfin Tang

A 180 gallon or larger aquarium is necessary to provide plenty of swimming room. It is aggressive towards its own species and conspecifics at times, but peaceful towards other fish in the tank. Introduce like species at once. Although Tangs will eat meaty foods along with the other fish in the aquarium, it is important that they are offered plenty of marine based seaweed and algae.

Sand Sifting Starfish

This peaceful omnivore will effectively clean even the largest home aquarium of detritus and left over food. Like other starfish, the Sand Sifting Sea Star will also consume small invertebrates, including shrimp, urchins, mollusks, bivalves, or other small sea stars. As such, the Sand Sifting Sea Star should be actively fed a varied diet consisting of natural food sources, especially in well-established marine aquariums.

Spotted Hawk

A 30 gallon or larger aquarium with plenty of hiding places is acceptable for this hardy and aggressive fish. It should not be kept with larger more aggressive hawkfish. Although it eats small fish and shrimp, with caution, it can make an excellent reef inhabitant.

Spotted Sweetlips Clown

A 300 gallon or larger aquarium is required due to its size and eating habits. It grows at a rapid pace to almost 3 feet in length. It needs a larger tank to provide it with ample swimming room and plenty of hiding places. If placed in a reef aquarium, the Spotted Sweetlips will eat smaller crustaceans, smaller fireworms, serpent stars, small snails, and polychaete worms.

Three Stripe Damsel

A 30 gallon or larger aquarium is suitable with plenty of hiding places. Due to its aggressive behavior as an adult, it will do well with other moderately aggressive fish in a community tank. It will not harm invertebrates or disturb the tank setting.


Tomato Clown

The very hardy Tomato Clownfish can be housed with most fish that will not eat it and is a good choice for tank-cycling. It should not be housed with any shy or passive feeding fish, as the Tomato Clownfish tends to be somewhat territorial and aggressive with conspecifics and as it gets older. As with all clownfish, most are born as males, and the dominant male will change to a female.

White Sebae Anenome

In the aquarium it requires strong lighting, porous live rock, and a variety of sandy and rocky locations from which it can choose to live. The addition of a Clownfish, such as the Blue Striped Clown, Amphiprion chrysopterus, will immediately help with its acclimatization and improve its chances of survival. When healthy, it will become very sticky. If it grasps onto something (or someone), it will be very difficult to convince it to let go without damaging it.

Yellow Belly Blue Damsel

Some people refer to Damsels as "The devil fish" because of their ability to bully almost everything else in the aquarium.
With this in mind if you are going to keep Damsels with other fish especially smaller fish it is wise to add the Damsels last of all so that the other fish have all ready claimed their territory. Very active fish that are constantly on the move at different levels of the tank.

Yellow Tail Blue Damsel

Native to the reefs of the Indo-Pacific, this member of the Pomacentridae family prefers multiple hiding places and peaceful tankmates. Though most Yellowtail Damselfish will ignore other fish, invertebrates, or corals, some may be territorial towards its own kind or similar-sized fish. The Yellowtail Damsel is best kept in small groups of odd numbered fish in suitably sized systems.

Yellow Tang

For best care, it should be housed in an aquarium of at least 100 gallons with ample room to swim. Like other Tangs, this member of the Acanthuridae family demonstrates territorial aggression towards its own species, or Tangs in general. Therefore, it is best to keep just one Yellow Hawaiian Tang per aquarium, unless multiple Yellow Hawaiian Tangs are introduced into the system simultaneously.

Misc

Anacharis

The Anacharis can be housed in tropical or coldwater aquariums. When kept in a tropical aquarium, they require regular additions of fertilizer and a moderate amount of light. With the addition of CO2 fertilization, they will thrive in even hard water. The Anacharis is an excellent nutrient controller and oxygen producer for all types of freshwater aquariums and is also a suitable plant for use in aquariums that house livebearers or American sunfish.

Aluminum

Its ovate green leaves are about 3 in (8 cm) long. Silvery streaks mark each leaf, adding a dramatic metallic design to its quilted texture. These unusual patterns give this plant another common name, watermelon plant. Not suited for aquarium use. Best planted as a house plant or rooted in a terrarium.

Banana

The banana-shaped roots of this plant should be planted no more than 1/4 of their length. Plant them by gently pressing them into the substrate. The Banana Plant should be provided with a minimum of 2 watts per gallon of light within the spectrum of 5000 to 7000K. The ideal water conditions for best results are a temperature of 68°-82°F, an alkalinity of 3 - 6 dKH and a pH of 6.0-7.2.

Bullfrog Tadpole

Time to metamorphosis ranges from a few months in the southern to three years in the northern parts of the geographic range. Maximum lifespan in the wild is estimated at 8 to 10 years, but one captive lived almost 16 years.

Crawfish

For best care, keep Crawfish in an aquarium or pond of at least 20 gallons. It requires plenty of rocks for shelter and moderately sized substrate in which it can burrow. Crawfish can be aggressive towards its own kind and requires plenty of room for individual territories. Therefore, larger aquariums or ponds will be needed if housing more than one Crawfish. When housing more than one Crawfish, provide at least 20 gallons per and include plenty of cover including both rocks and plants.

Golden Clam

A nice and soft sandy bottom or very small gravel substrate is recommended as they are partial burrowers. They can be kept in almost any type of setting with or without plants. For general aquarium settings allow the clam around an 6-8 inch square for themselves.

Green Hedge

a terrarium plant that is very decorative and sometimes used as an aquarium plant. It can only withstand being submerged for several months and must then be taken out and grown emerged for several months before being submerged again. It is very hardy and can be used in a Cichlid tank.

Hornwort

Hornwort, also known as Coontail, has sturdy, layered hair-like foliage that helps oxygenate and clarify the water as well as keep algae growth to a minimum. It is found free-floating worldwide, in moving and still waters, or loosely anchored in muddy bottoms. Hornwort leaves are dark green and grow from a 1/2 to 1-1/2 inches long on stems that can reach 24 inches in length. They may be potted or just left to float in the aquarium.

Janet Craig

"Janet" is well worth getting to know. Although tropical by nature, it adapts beautifully to average home conditions. In fact, it does so well on its own, you don't need to fuss over it at all.Young plants are a tuft of upright leaves. As the plant grows, it forms a cane-like stem with a cluster of leaves at its top.Its dark-green leaves are naturally shiny. Because of their upright form, they can be dust-catchers. Keep the leaves clean by wiping them off with a damp cloth.

Jungle Val

When Jungle Val is given the right conditions, it will grow and spread runners like no other plant you have ever imagined. Jungle Vallisneria typically has little runners that form a new plant about one inch from the base of the main plant. The more you cut the Jungle Vallisneria, the more it will grow and spread runners.

Moss Ball

The Moss Ball requires moderate to high lighting, approximately 3 watts per gallon provided by full spectrum (5000-7000K) bulbs. The temperature of the water should be between 72°-82°F, with an alkalinity of 3-8 dKH and a neutral pH. The Moss Ball propagates by division. It starts with a division line which progresses to the splitting off of a smaller new Moss Ball.

Mystery Snail

The apple snails are popular aquarium-pets because of their attractive appearance and size. When taken good care of some apple snail species can reach a large size (15 cm / 6 inch diameter in case of Pomacea maculata, sometimes faulty referred to as Ampullarius gigas). Apple snails are in fact the biggest living freshwater snails on earth.

Ruffle Sword

These plants absorb carbon dioxide and nitrates, and provide shelter and security for fish. The Ruffled Sword comes from Brazil. Does best with high amounts of light and nutrient rich substrates. Highly sensitive to copper. Propagation occurs via shoots.

Sanderiana

Although it grows better in soil, it is often sold with the roots in water. The water should be completely changed every two weeks. The water should be bottled water, soft tap water with very little fluoride, or even water from a filtered, established aquarium. It does best in bright, indirect lighting and temperatures.

Water Hyacinth

Water Hyacinth bears leathery foliage that creeps across the surface of the pond. The foliage helps to provide shade and the roots provide filtration, a spawning area for the pond fish, and absorb excess nutrients from the water, helping to reduce algae. It also is an excellent water clarifier. The delicate, purple flowers have a yellow "eye" on one petal, last approximately one day, but bloom throughout the season, and add a pleasing splash of color to the pond.

Water Lettuce

Water Lettuce helps to provide shade for the pond and fish, as well as a safe haven and spawning area for the fish. They help oxygenate and clarify the water and will use the extra organic nutrients in the pond, thereby reducing algae production.

Water Lilly

There are about 70 species of water lilies around the world. The genus Nymphaea contains about 35 species across the Northern Hemisphere. The genus Victoria contains two species of giant water lilies and can be found in South America. Water lilies are rooted in soil in bodies of water, with leaves and flowers floating on the water surface. The leaves are round, with a radial notch in Nymphaea and Nuphar, but fully circular in Victoria.


 

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